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Investing In Research

Children’s Cancer North funds valuable work being carried out at the Wolfson Childhood Cancer Research Centre in Newcastle. The facility provides a centre of excellence where expert clinical and research teams come together to advance their understanding of how to treat childhood cancers.

This unique approach directly links clinical professionals at Great North Children’s Hospital with University academics and scientists, enabling patients across the North of England and beyond to participate in early phase trials.

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Areas of research

Early phase trials

Childrens' tumours are individually rare, so national and international collaboration is crucial. Newcastle Centre for Cancer has lead roles in national and international collaborations, making treatments available to children and young people in the North of England that they otherwise wouldn't have access to.
“The trials are what have kept Rebecca with us, they have saved her life three times."

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Childhood brain tumours

Brain tumours are the most common cause of death from cancer in childhood. The team at Newcastle Centre for Cancer carry out biological discovery to deliver the next generation of improved brain tumour therapies. They focus on two of the major high-risk brain tumour types of childhood: medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour (ATRT).

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Individualisation of treatments

Current treatments for children with cancer are based on aggressive treatments with significant side effects. These impact the long-term quality of life for many surviving patients.
Scientists at the Wolfson Childhood Cancer Research Centre are working to understand the molecular mechanisms which drive the development of cancer to improve the therapy and outcomes for children.

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“It’s hard to overstate the importance of clinical trials for young cancer patients. We meet with children and young adults with cancer every day and we know what these new treatments mean to them.”

— Dr Quentin Campbell-Hewson, Lead for Clinical Trial and Consultant Paediatric Oncologist, Great North Childrens’ Hospital

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